Tucson Gem and Mineral Show 2014

2014 - February. Another visit to the yearly Tucson Gem and mineral show.  Having gone every year for the past 14 years I have gotten quite good at cruising through the show, seeing what's new, and catching up with industry friends. For those who don't know, the Tucson gem show, held every February in Tucson, Arizona, is the worlds largest and greatest gem, and mineral show. At nearly 40 venues, the show's massive size takes over the small city for the better part of 3 weeks, making an exciting and energetic time for all those attending.  The show's various venues showcase a variety of item, some for wholesale and manufacturers, some for store owners, and some for hobbyists. There are venues dedicated to fine gems, some for minerals, a large number for beads, and of course, some dedicated to the spiritual side of stones. My main focus are precious gems and minerals - precious as part of the trade, and minerals as a collector's hobby.  Because of the show's large size and importance in the world of gems and minerals, it's a good place to get a look at the worldwide industry trends, as well as prices and market availability. Running through the venues over the week I took note of a few important trends worth mentioning.  There are 2 main cut gemstone shows for trade only customers. These shows represent the majority of gemstones available worldwide, and supplier foreign and domestic bring goods for sale to jewelers and jewelry professionals. Looking over the goods, the first thing that pops out are prices and availability. Going booth to booth it's evident that old staple gemstones are becoming notably scares and pricey. Popular for many years, beautiful blue sapphires were nearly non-existent, with prices going through the roof on stones for sale. Also notably pricey were rubies, which seem to have gone up precipitously over the last 10 years. Perhaps 5 to 10 fold easily.  One notable positive was that more and more beautiful Mozambique  rubies were present,  finally offering a relatively nice alternative to prohibited Burmese rubies and extinct Thai rubies. It's nice to see the quality of these gems improving as more mining activity takes place.  Meanwhile, emeralds were well represented, as were Paraiba colored tourmalines, tsavorites, and mandarin garnets. The problem however was that while there seemed to be an abundance of these gems, price are through the roof. Emeralds have doubled in price over the last year, even though, as it would seem, stock supplies are high. Because of the high price of tsavorite garnet, the similarly colored chrome tourmaline has also risen in price by about 40% year over year. These high prices lead to one inevitable conclusion - higher jewelry prices.  So what to make of the market? Well, the prices suggest a few things. Firstly, in the case of sapphires, the supply is just diminishing, and the mines are not producing as they once were. It also suggests that other markets (read Asian markets) are consuming these items at a much higher rate than the US market. Another take away is that the goods are passing through less hands to get to dealers. This basically means that the prices at the mines are going higher as the mine owners cut out various middle people to sell directly. It can also be inferred that larger players are controlling more and more of the supply, such as in the case of Emerald, where even though there is an abundance of stock, large cutters and mining companies are not looking to drop prices to move product. Simply, they would rather sell at higher prices in a slower fashion.  So with that I decided to spend more hobby time looking at minerals than cut gems.

2014 - February. Another visit to the yearly Tucson Gem and mineral show.  Having gone every year for the past 14 years I have gotten quite good at cruising through the show, seeing what's new, and catching up with industry friends. For those who don't know, the Tucson gem show, held every February in Tucson, Arizona, is the worlds largest and greatest gem, and mineral show. At nearly 40 venues, the show's massive size takes over the small city for the better part of 3 weeks, making an exciting and energetic time for all those attending.

The show's various venues showcase a variety of item, some for wholesale and manufacturers, some for store owners, and some for hobbyists. There are venues dedicated to fine gems, some for minerals, a large number for beads, and of course, some dedicated to the spiritual side of stones. My main focus are precious gems and minerals - precious as part of the trade, and minerals as a collector's hobby.

Because of the show's large size and importance in the world of gems and minerals, it's a good place to get a look at the worldwide industry trends, as well as prices and market availability. Running through the venues over the week I took note of a few important trends worth mentioning.

There are 2 main cut gemstone shows for trade only customers. These shows represent the majority of gemstones available worldwide, and supplier foreign and domestic bring goods for sale to jewelers and jewelry professionals. Looking over the goods, the first thing that pops out are prices and availability. Going booth to booth it's evident that old staple gemstones are becoming notably scares and pricey. Popular for many years, beautiful blue sapphires were nearly non-existent, with prices going through the roof on stones for sale. Also notably pricey were rubies, which seem to have gone up precipitously over the last 10 years. Perhaps 5 to 10 fold easily.  One notable positive was that more and more beautiful Mozambique  rubies were present,  finally offering a relatively nice alternative to prohibited Burmese rubies and extinct Thai rubies. It's nice to see the quality of these gems improving as more mining activity takes place.

Meanwhile, emeralds were well represented, as were Paraiba colored tourmalines, tsavorites, and mandarin garnets. The problem however was that while there seemed to be an abundance of these gems, price are through the roof. Emeralds have doubled in price over the last year, even though, as it would seem, stock supplies are high. Because of the high price of tsavorite garnet, the similarly colored chrome tourmaline has also risen in price by about 40% year over year. These high prices lead to one inevitable conclusion - higher jewelry prices.

So what to make of the market? Well, the prices suggest a few things. Firstly, in the case of sapphires, the supply is just diminishing, and the mines are not producing as they once were. It also suggests that other markets (read Asian markets) are consuming these items at a much higher rate than the US market. Another take away is that the goods are passing through less hands to get to dealers. This basically means that the prices at the mines are going higher as the mine owners cut out various middle people to sell directly. It can also be inferred that larger players are controlling more and more of the supply, such as in the case of Emerald, where even though there is an abundance of stock, large cutters and mining companies are not looking to drop prices to move product. Simply, they would rather sell at higher prices in a slower fashion.

So with that I decided to spend more hobby time looking at minerals than cut gems.

An amazing survivalist. This piece of quartz managed to hold onto the black aegirine crystal as it made its journey all the way from Malawi.

An amazing survivalist. This piece of quartz managed to hold onto the black aegirine crystal as it made its journey all the way from Malawi.

Beautiful blue color. One of the most intense blue Aquamarines I've seen. This one from Vietnam. 

Beautiful blue color. One of the most intense blue Aquamarines I've seen. This one from Vietnam. 

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Halite - AKA salt forms beautiful crystals - just don't get them wet or they will melt. This was a great color. Normally the color is an intense blue green, but these look almost like tanzanite in color.

Here's me hiding behind a giant copper nugget.

Here's me hiding behind a giant copper nugget.

The old spirit of the Tuscon show - individuals from all over the world buying and selling rocks. This cool Brooklynite rocking a beard is holding a box of chrysocolla.

The old spirit of the Tuscon show - individuals from all over the world buying and selling rocks. This cool Brooklynite rocking a beard is holding a box of chrysocolla.

Beautiful layout of minerals.

Beautiful layout of minerals.

Not to forget the fossils - this giant fish is from Kemmerer, Wyoming. Well preserved fossil fish are found here, in the prehistoric lake-bed. Amazing place to visit and try collecting yourself (but don't expect to find such an exceptional fish easily.

Not to forget the fossils - this giant fish is from Kemmerer, Wyoming. Well preserved fossil fish are found here, in the prehistoric lake-bed. Amazing place to visit and try collecting yourself (but don't expect to find such an exceptional fish easily.

Tray of high quality Mexican opal.

Tray of high quality Mexican opal.

When light hits Mexican opal the play of color is exquisite.

When light hits Mexican opal the play of color is exquisite.

The end of a beautiful day - and a short but nice trip

The end of a beautiful day - and a short but nice trip

New Jewelry and E-Store Coming to Michael Abraham

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Most of what I have been doing to this point has been based around custom items for private clients. This is getting a refresh, as I add a collection of elegant, timeless pieces to my lineup of products. Everyone should have some colorful basics, and I will be rolling out new and attractive pieces though my upcoming online store here at www.michaelabrahamgems.com

Stay tuned to see some unique pieces, all done in 18k gold or platinum.

Essentials of Quality - A Fully Handmade Engagement Ring

Making a fully handmade ring is something very few companies do. Today, most rings, even diamonds rings, are made by wax casting metal and then polishing that metal. The results from cast pieces vary depending on the wax, the casting, the design, and the people doing the polishing work. Though great results can be achieved through casting, some people want a product made in a more traditional way.

A handmade ring is something very rare in today's world because of the time it takes to make it, and the skill needed to perform all to procedures properly. Handmade rings typically cost double that of the highest quality cast piece. However, when a master jeweler makes a handmade ring, there is an intangible beauty to it which is not possible to replicate through other methods. 

The first step in making a hand made ring, is to form together metal in a block or a disk.  

The first step in making a hand made ring, is to form together metal in a block or a disk.  

The platinum is heated to remove any impurities and to form a disk which can then be rolled into wire.  

The platinum is heated to remove any impurities and to form a disk which can then be rolled into wire.  

The platinum disk is passed through a metal roller multiple time in order to form wire.  

The platinum disk is passed through a metal roller multiple time in order to form wire.  

The wire is then pounded on an anvil to squeeze out impurities.  

The wire is then pounded on an anvil to squeeze out impurities.  

The hammered wire is passed through the roller again, and begins to take on a shinier appearance.  

The hammered wire is passed through the roller again, and begins to take on a shinier appearance.  

Pieces of wire are then cut to form various portions of the ring head. These are then attached to a plate at the bottom.  

Pieces of wire are then cut to form various portions of the ring head. These are then attached to a plate at the bottom.  

Since this ring had tapered baguettes on the sides, wire is cut and filed to create settings to mouth the baguettes in. 

Since this ring had tapered baguettes on the sides, wire is cut and filed to create settings to mouth the baguettes in. 

The settings for the baguettes are soldered to the plate and the center stone holder, and the stones are checked to make sure they will fit.

The settings for the baguettes are soldered to the plate and the center stone holder, and the stones are checked to make sure they will fit.

The top portion of the ring is filed to give shape and delicacy to the ring. Notice how the plate is slowly being filed away  

The top portion of the ring is filed to give shape and delicacy to the ring. Notice how the plate is slowly being filed away  

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After the top is formed wire is bent to form the shape of the ring shank. Then it is cut to perfectly fit the head.  The piece is tested to make sure it's a perfect fit.

After the head and the shank are check that they match, the jeweler goes ahead and solders them together to form the complete ring shape. After it's connected the ring is then filed even more to create curves and lines as part of the design.  Also note that the prong is split in half. It will have a double prong setting.

After the head and the shank are check that they match, the jeweler goes ahead and solders them together to form the complete ring shape. After it's connected the ring is then filed even more to create curves and lines as part of the design.  Also note that the prong is split in half. It will have a double prong setting.

The stones are then set in the platinum, and the ring finally polished.  

The stones are then set in the platinum, and the ring finally polished.  

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The final hand made piece is complete after many procedures taking a great deal of time. The advantages to this type of ring are in the quality of the metal work. there is simply no way to get a cleaner and more well finished piece. But is it worth the extra expense? That depends on ones appreciation for the tiny details, and for the work of a master craftsman.